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Doing The Work: How Eventbrite Creators Make Inclusivity The Norm

As more people grasp the importance of making the world (and their events) a more welcoming place, event diversity and inclusion have become hot topics for hosts and attendees alike. But while it’s currently trending, the work of diversity, equity, and inclusion is not new.

“If the people who you wish were coming to your events are not showing up, you have to do a deeper look at why that might be,” says Georgia Stitt, the founder of Maestra Music, an organization giving support, visibility, and community to female-identifying, non-binary, and gender non-conforming people making music in the theater industry.

“The number of women musicians working in theatrical orchestra pits right now hovers around 22 percent,” says Stitt. “Part of the way you break the cycle of a male-dominated field is to create situations where the women are the experts.” Maestra’s music-focused, all-level educational events are open to everyone, and always hosted by someone other than a cisgender man.

It’s important for [Maestra] to state out loud [on the event page] how much we want men, women, transgender, and [gender] non-conforming musicians working in the same space, learning from the women+ who are leaders in their field,” says Stitt. Maestra’s educational event listings all include the phrase, “Open to all genders, all skill-sets, all levels of expertise.”

Read more HERE.

Originally posted by Quinne Myers at Eventbrite

 


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